And Down The Stretch They Come In NY
Legal Sports Report

Did The Illinois Bill Create A Knock-On Effect For New NY Sports Betting Amendment?

NY sports betting

Sports fans might soon be able to place bets on the New York Knicks and Rangers from Madison Square Garden or the Yankees at Yankee Stadium.

Sen. Joseph Addabbo Jr. introduced an amendment to his sports betting bill Wednesday that would allow sports betting at racetracks, off-track betting parlors, and sports stadiums and arenas. The Illinois sports betting bill also allows for betting at arenas and stadiums.

These facilities could take part in NY sports betting as affiliates, partnering with casinos to use their mobile wagering platforms and host their self-service mobile sports betting kiosks.

By connecting the kiosks on the affiliate’s premises to the physical casino, lawmakers believe it would satisfy state constitutionality concerns. In 2013,  voters approved NY sports betting only at the four commercial casinos.

Addabbo follows through on promise

Prior to voting the bill through the Senate Racing, Gaming and Wagering Committee last month, many members expressed unease with the horse racing industry — including racetracks, racinos and off-track betting parlors — being removed from the legislation.

Addabbo responded that he shared those concerns and hoped to add the racing industry back into the bill before its passage.

In return, casinos would be allowed to offer betting on horse races.

While sports betting at New York Racing Association facilities and OTBs could start at the same time as upstate casinos, S 17B has a regulatory delay period of 12 months after the effective date of the law before sports betting would be allowed at racinos and video lottery terminal locations.

Mets stadium left out for sports betting

The amendment allows that a professional sports stadium or arena may serve as the affiliate only in a county that does not have another affiliate.

That includes:

  • Barclays Center in Brooklyn (Nets, Islanders)
  • Nassau Coliseum on Long Island (Islanders)

Not included:

  • Citi Field in Queens (Mets), because of Aqueduct
  • MetLife Stadium in New Jersey (Giants, Jets)
  • New Era Field in Buffalo (Bills)

There would be a 20-month regulatory delay period before sports facilities would be permitted to have sports betting.

Much remains the same in NY sports betting

Other than the addition of the affiliate language, most of the key elements of S 17B are the same as the previous amendment made by Addabbo and Assemblyman Gary Pretlow last month.

  • No requirement for in-person registration.
  • Only one skin allowed per casino license.
  • 0.20% of handle goes to professional sports leagues as an integrity fee.
  • Initial license fee of $12 million.
  • Tax rate of 8.5% for brick-and-mortar wagering and 12% for mobile wagering.
  • Casinos are required to use official league data for in-play wagers if the data is made available on commercially reasonable terms as determined by the New York Gaming Commission.

What’s next for sports betting legislation in NY

The amended Senate bill was recommitted to the Senate Finance Committee.

Legal Sports Report confirmed that Pretlow has put in to introduce the same changes to A 6113.

All their efforts could be for naught if Gov. Andrew Cuomo doesn’t come around on the legality of mobile servers located on casino properties.

There are less than two weeks left in the legislative session, which ends June 19.

Until the narrative coming from the governor’s office changes, the odds of legal and regulated sports bets being placed at Madison Square Garden are worse than the odds of Kevin Durant playing there in a Knicks uniform.

Matthew Kredell
- Matthew started his career as a sportswriter at the Los Angeles Daily News, where he covered the NFL, Kobe-Shaq three-peat, Pete Carroll’s USC football teams, USC basketball, pro tennis, Kings hockey and fulfilled his childhood dream of sitting in the Dodgers’ dugout. His reporting on efforts to legalize sports betting began in 2010, when Playboy Magazine flew him to Prague to hang out with online sportsbook pioneer Calvin Ayre and show how the NFL was pushing US money overseas by fighting expansion of regulated sports betting across the country. A USC journalism alum, Matt also has written on a variety of topics for Men’s Journal, Los Angeles magazine, LA Weekly and ESPN.com.
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